U.S.-EU: COMPETING POLICIES TOWARDS CHINA
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U.S.-EU: COMPETING POLICIES TOWARDS CHINA
Annotation
PII
S268667300000616-7-1
Publication type
Article
Status
Published
Authors
Oleg Prikhodko 
Edition
Pages
21-39
Abstract
D. Trump's election in 2016 caused remarkable shifts in U.S. foreign policy, and America's relationship with China is no exception in this process. A renewed U.S. policy towards Beijing appears to be a mixture of tough measures primarily in trade and economic issues coupled with political pressure on the Chinese authorities regarding the North Korean nuclear and missile programs with simultaneous signs signaling Washington's willingness to settle disagreements and mitigate emerging discords. The European Union, as opposed to the United States, is inclined to pursue an open-minded attitude towards China emphasizing the importance of good relations and flourishing trade and economic ties with this future superpower for Europe's prosperity. The United States and the EU face a common challenge how to accommodate China's geopolitical and economic expansion in the world. However, they appear to lean to competing priorities in their relationship with Beijing, though the U.S. and Europe have a number of shared goals in dealing with it. The American and European diverging perceptions and views on China, mismatch of their stakes and leverages in the Asia-Pacific region prevent the transatlantic partners from forging a common strategy with regard to the Asian giant.
Keywords
the United States, the EU, China, the Trump Administration, the Asia-Pacific region
Date of publication
09.03.2018
Number of purchasers
1
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58
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